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May 23, 2019  
HEART NEWS: Feature Story

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  • New Campaign Urges Women To <i>Go Red</i>

    New Campaign Urges Women To Go Red


    February 03, 2004
    (NAPSI)-While more women today are aware that they are at risk for heart disease, a very large number still do not realize that it is their number one killer.

    That's why the American Heart Association's new Go Red For Women campaign uses the color red to draw attention to heart disease and urges women to take control of their health and learn more about cardiovascular disease.

    Ninety percent of women feel they have power over their health -but only 27 percent say their health is a top priority, according to a recent American Heart Association survey. This lack of urgency about such a serious health threat contributes to the deaths of nearly 500,000 American women every year.

    "Our focus is to empower women to reduce their risk of heart disease," said Nieca Goldberg, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at New York University. "The Go Red For Women campaign outlines a plan to help women take action against heart disease."

    To Go Red For Women, eat healthfully, exercise, don't smoke, maintain a healthy weight, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol level, and control diabetes, if you have it. Learn your family's medical history and visit your doctor to find out if you are at risk for heart disease or stroke. If a healthy diet and exercise doesn't work, then talk to your doctor about medication and take it as prescribed. Even if you need medicine, a healthy diet and exercise are still important.

    The campaign is sponsored by Pfizer, which will conduct educational campaigns throughout the country, and Macy's, which will develop a marketing effort including special merchandise to benefit the American Heart Association. It is funded with a grant from PacifiCare.

    People can support heart disease and stroke research and education by purchasing designated products and gift items from companies such as Swarovski Crystal, Pantene, OPI Products, Le Mystere, Walgreens, St. John, Ross Dress for Less and Angel Wreaths. A portion of proceeds from the sale of these products will benefit the American Heart Association.

    Call 1-888-MY-HEART or visit americanheart.org for heart health tips and information on Simple Solutions and Choose to Move, the American Heart Association's free lifestyle programs that will help your heart, your health and your life.

    Red is the color that symbolizes heart disease in women and empowers them to take charge of their health.

    Last updated: 03-Feb-04

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