Heart1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Heart News
Feature Story
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
Diagnostics
 Heart Attack Center
Prevention
Survivors
Dr. Tod Engelhardt  Heart
 Hero™

Dr. Tod Engelhardt:
Combating Major Blood Clots.
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion  in  Our Forums
 Community
Heart1 Forums
Patient Stories
 Reference
Online Resources
Video Library
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
March 26, 2019  
HEART NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Links/Reprints
  • Patients Size Up Risk of Heart Disease

    Questionnaire Helps Patients Size Up Risk of Heart Disease


    December 01, 2004

    By: Diana Barnes-Brown for Heart1

    Researchers of the Framingham Heart Study in Framingham, Massachusetts have invented a questionnaire that they say will help patients learn their own risk of developing heart disease after providing a few simple answers.

    To complete the questionnaire, patients must fill out a one-page form asking for information about factors such as cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking. Patients can fill out the questionnaire either by hand or on a computer, and as long as they have the necessary data on hand, their score can be processed immediately and either sent to doctors or used by patients themselves to aid in the practice of good heart health.

    The questionnaire has the potential to provide advantages for patients and caregivers both, because it offers a single “universal” number rather than a series of complex test results that have to be reinterpreted every time they are examined. Also, the questionnaire gives patients a reading of where their own numbers are in comparison to those belonging to people with a clean bill of health.

    The assessment technique is still a novelty in the medical community, but if it is found to be an accurate indicator over time, it could be instrumental in making heart risk assessment much easier and far more efficient. It also has the potential to help the average patient get more involved in his or her heart health, by turning a range of confusing information into an informative, easy-to-interpret number on a relativity scale.

    The Framingham Heart Study is a research project that began roughly 50 years ago, thanks to the U.S. Public Health Service’s decision to base their epidemiological heart health study in the area. Since then, it has grown with the help of funding and researchers from the National Heart Institute (now known as the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) and the Boston University School of Medicine. The Study has been responsible for a number of influential findings regarding heart health and risk factors.

    Source: Framingham Heart Study

    Last updated: 01-Dec-04

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Heart1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Heart Disease Patients Need to Exercise to Benefit from the Protective Effects of Wine

    Effective Treatment for Heart Failure Possible Following Discovery of Heart Molecule

    Significant Decrease in Heart Disease after Prison Smoking Bans

    Heart Failure Patients Who Sleep Poorly Are at Double the Risk for Hospitalization

    Long-Term Survival Possible for Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    The risk of cardiac death due to a lower ejection fraction

    Plaques/fatty deposits as a cause for a heart attack

    Cholesterol and the Ejection Fraction: Risk factors for Cardiac Arrests - Interview with Dr. Coman

    More Features ...
     
    Related Content
    Skip the Fat and Sodium to Stay Stroke Free

    Heart Disease Causes Seen Same Worldwide

    Heart Failure

    Heart Disease (CAD

    Heart Attack

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2019 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.