Heart1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Heart News
Feature Story
 Education Center
Conditions
Procedures
Diagnostics
 Heart Attack Center
Prevention
Survivors
Dr. Tod Engelhardt  Heart
 Hero™

Dr. Tod Engelhardt:
Combating Major Blood Clots.
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion  in  Our Forums
 Community
Heart1 Forums
Patient Stories
 Reference
Online Resources
Video Library
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
March 24, 2019  
HEART NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Links/Reprints
  • diabetes

    Potential for Prevention and Treatment of Heart Failure in Diabetics


    December 12, 2013

    Source: University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

    Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered one of the pathogenic components of diabetes in the heart, as published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

    While both heart disease and diabetes are widely studied, how diabetic cardiomyopathy develops is not well understood, other than that it seemed to be linked to protein kinase C (PKC) - a family of enzymes that controls the functions of other proteins by using phosphates to turn them on and off.

    Researchers at UTMB, led by assistant professor of biochemistry Dr. Muge Kuyumcu-Martinez, studied the effects of PKC signals in the hearts of diabetic mice.

    "We now know that the leading cause of diabetic cardiomyopathy can be attributed to PKC activation and its downstream effects on gene expression," said Kuyumcu-Martinez. "Knowing how cardiomyopathy manifests, further research can use these results to concentrate on the prevention and treatment of heart failure in diabetics."

    Cardiomyopathy, a known symptom of diabetes, occurs when the muscles of the heart weaken, and the heart is no longer strong enough to pump blood and properly circulate it throughout the body. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart failure than the rest of the population.

    The researchers discovered that when PKC is over-activated, the cells of the adult heart revert to splicing methods used during the embryonic stages. Genes contain codes for certain processes and products, such as proteins, and they send signals to the body to complete these processes and products through messenger RNA. Alternative splicing occurs when one gene contains the codes for multiple proteins. The human genome contains 20,000 protein-coding genes, so using one gene to create more than one protein is an efficient process - when it's running correctly. But problems occur when the genetic information is abnormally spliced or mis-spliced to messenger RNA, giving it mutated instructions. As much as one-third of genetic disease and many cancers are attributed to splicing changes.

    In the case of diabetic cardiomyopathy, the research team used RNA sequencing technology to identify 22 specific alternative splicing events that occur, causing a developmental shift in the gene expression. This shift causes mechanisms of the heart to behave as though it were still an embryo, which prevents the heart from functioning correctly in a full-grown adult fighting diabetes.

    Discuss in the Heart1 forums

    Photo: Melissa P.

    Last updated: 12-Dec-13

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Heart1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Heart Disease Patients Need to Exercise to Benefit from the Protective Effects of Wine

    Effective Treatment for Heart Failure Possible Following Discovery of Heart Molecule

    Significant Decrease in Heart Disease after Prison Smoking Bans

    Heart Failure Patients Who Sleep Poorly Are at Double the Risk for Hospitalization

    Long-Term Survival Possible for Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    The risk of cardiac death due to a lower ejection fraction

    The function of a defibrillator

    Plaques/fatty deposits as a cause for a heart attack

    More Features ...
     
    Related Content
    Knee Replacement 101 – Part Two

    Enabling Women To Spend Less Time Sitting Could Reduce Diabetes Risk

    The Importance Of Fat Location And How Belly Fat Differs From Thigh Fat

    Go Red for the American Heart Association’s Fight Against Heart Disease

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2019 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.